Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

BibTex information for books?

November 30, 2011

If your are citing books and you are sick of creating the BibTex data for yourself: Cheer up, there is a easy way to get the data created. You just have to get the ISBN Number of the book (easiest by finding the book on wikipedia). Then you use the OttoBib webservice. Just replace the ISBN number in this example

http://www.ottobib.com/isbn/9780199535705/bibtex

Calling this URL gives you

@Book{marx2008capital,
author = {Marx, Karl},
title = {Capital : an abridged edition},
publisher = {Oxford University Press},
year = {2008},
address = {Oxford New York},
isbn = {9780199535705}
}

Easy and a real life saver….

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Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future

September 22, 2008

CC evangelist and acclaimed author Cory Doctorow announced [today] the release of his new book, Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future. Content is exactly what it claims to be – 28 essays on “everything from copyright and DRM to the layout of phone-keypads, the fallacy of the semantic web, the nature of futurism, the necessity of privacy in a digital world, the reason to love Wikipedia, the miracle of fanfic, and many other subjects”. If that wasn’t inciting enough, Content also boasts an introduction from EFF co-founder John Perry Barlow and book design by acclaimed typographer John D Berry.

Like his other novels, Doctorow has chosen to release Content both as a print book for sale and as a free-to-download CC BY-NC-SA licensed PDF. In his essay, “Giving it Away” (originally published in Forbes, December 2006 – republished in Content).

Source: CreativeCommons.org

“The Ant King: and Other Stories” Released Under CC License

September 12, 2008

Ben Rosenbaum, an American science fiction writer and computer programmer, recently released his latest collection of sci-fi shorts, The Ant King: and Other Stories, as both a print collection through Small Beer Press and a free download under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

Source: CreativeCommons.org

The Cultural Significance of Free Software

June 15, 2008

Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software is a new book by Christopher Kelty that explores the “history and cultural significance of Free Software”, narrating a time line about “the people and practices that have transformed not only software, but also music, film, science, and education” in contemporary society. Released in print by Duke University Press, Two Bits is also licensed under a CC BY-NC-SA license, making the text remixable, reusable, and in general more fluid.

Source: CreativeCommons.org

Legal torrent?!

April 29, 2008

LegalTorrents, “an online community created to discover and distribute Creative Commons licensed digital media”, has re-launched in exciting fashion. Originally founded in 2003 as a means to distribute “hand-picked .torrent files that were approved by content owners“, LegalTorrents revamped its infrastructure to be more friendly to content creators looking to spread their works far and wide, a goal which included a clear articulation of CC-licenses in relation to relevant torrent files. [More Information…]

Source: CreativeCommons.org

Rockin’ Eco Hero

March 20, 2008

Steve TrashOver the past 25 years, “illusionist, eco-entertainer and kid comedian” Steve Trash has been sharing tips with kids about what we can do to make the world just a little bit greener.

CreativeCommons.org reports that Steve Trash released his book The Magic of Ecology as an E-Book… licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works license.

The Magic of Ecology offers 22 magic tricks that illustrate ecological principles of science. Steve says the tricks are great for teachers and kids (both little and big)

I think its a great idea to combine the art of illusions to attract children and in the same time teaching them being green is cool.

Source: CreativeCommons.org

Wireless Network Howto for Developing Countries

February 26, 2008

If you are interested about information how you can build and maintain wireless networks in developing countries, you may be interested in the book
Wireless Networking in the Developing World. This book explains this on about 425 pages.

 The second edition has just been released under a CC Attribution-ShareAlike license with versions in English, Spanish, French, Italian, Arabic, and soon Portuguese. Wireless Network Howto for Developing Countries

There is also a short article explaining why such networks can be usefull.
The  CC Attribution-ShareAlike license of the book means that

You are free:

  • to Remix — to adapt the work

Under the following conditions:

  • Attribution. You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • Share Alike. If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same, similar or a compatible license.

Source: CreativeCommons.org

H.P. Lovecraft for free

January 22, 2008

Some of you may know H.P. Lovecraft. Now his books are freely available thx to the concept of public domain.
You can download his books on manybooks.net.

Browse through the most popular titles, recommendations, or recent reviews from our visitors. Perhaps you’ll find something interesting in the special collections. There are 19,546 eBooks available here and they’re all free!

As CreativeCommons.org states it

With the advent of more ebook reading devices, sites like Manybooks.net are providing a useful service in transforming digital materials into a variety of electronic formats that can be read by several different ebook readers and mobile devices. All of the 19,000+ ebooks on Manybooks are available for free. Many works are originally sourced from Project Gutenberg, a longstanding project to release books in the public domain as digital texts.

Source: CreativeCommons.org

The Future of Ideas

January 20, 2008

Lawrence Lessig, creator of CreativeCommons has released his Book The Future of Ideas under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license.
You can read his blog about it or download it for free.

This means all four of my books are now CC licensed. Code (v1) was licensed under a BY-SA license; so too, Code (v2). And Free Culture and now The Future of Ideas are licensed under BY-NC licenses.

In The Future of Ideas, Lawrence Lessig explains how the Internet revolution has produced a counterrevolution of devastating power and effect. The explosion of innovation we have seen in the environment of the Internet was not conjured from some new, previously unimagined technological magic; instead, it came from an ideal as old as the nation. Creativity flourished there because the Internet protected an innovation commons. The Internet’s very design built a neutral platform upon which the widest range of creators could experiment. The legal architecture surrounding it protected this free space so that culture and information–the ideas of our era–could flow freely and inspire an unprecedented breadth of expression. But this structural design is changing–both legally and technically.

Source: CreativeCommons.org

New Creative Commons released book: Political Novel “Republic”

January 5, 2008

As CreativeCommons.org reporta

Author and veteran Charles Sheehan-Miles decided to kick off the New Year with an action rather than a resolution by releasing the e-book of his novel, Republic, under a CC BY-NC-ND license. From Sheehan-Miles.

Why does this man release his book for free over the internet?

“…the biggest challenge most authors face isn’t online piracy. It’s not people out there diabolically copying their works and distributing them for free. In fact most authors (including yours truly) suffer from a different problem entirely — no one has ever heard of them. After all, literally hundreds of thousands of new titles come out every year, and only a few hundred writers in the entire United States (if that many) actually live off their books full time. So, by giving away the book, I hope more people actually read it.”

You can download the book as a pdf or read it online as html.

The book is released under a CC BY-NC-ND license.

Source: CreativeCommons.org