Posts Tagged ‘Books’

BibTex information for books?

November 30, 2011

If your are citing books and you are sick of creating the BibTex data for yourself: Cheer up, there is a easy way to get the data created. You just have to get the ISBN Number of the book (easiest by finding the book on wikipedia). Then you use the OttoBib webservice. Just replace the ISBN number in this example

http://www.ottobib.com/isbn/9780199535705/bibtex

Calling this URL gives you

@Book{marx2008capital,
author = {Marx, Karl},
title = {Capital : an abridged edition},
publisher = {Oxford University Press},
year = {2008},
address = {Oxford New York},
isbn = {9780199535705}
}

Easy and a real life saver….

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Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future

September 22, 2008

CC evangelist and acclaimed author Cory Doctorow announced [today] the release of his new book, Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future. Content is exactly what it claims to be – 28 essays on “everything from copyright and DRM to the layout of phone-keypads, the fallacy of the semantic web, the nature of futurism, the necessity of privacy in a digital world, the reason to love Wikipedia, the miracle of fanfic, and many other subjects”. If that wasn’t inciting enough, Content also boasts an introduction from EFF co-founder John Perry Barlow and book design by acclaimed typographer John D Berry.

Like his other novels, Doctorow has chosen to release Content both as a print book for sale and as a free-to-download CC BY-NC-SA licensed PDF. In his essay, “Giving it Away” (originally published in Forbes, December 2006 – republished in Content).

Source: CreativeCommons.org

CC licensed book: Postsingular

November 9, 2007

As the weblog of the creative commons project reported Rudy Rucker has released a science fiction novel.
This book is licensed under the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs.
You can download the book as a pdf on the books website.
This means:

You are free:

Under the following conditions:

  • Attribution. You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • Noncommercial. You may not use this work for commercial purposes.
  • No Derivative Works. You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.

Source: Creative Commons 

Design Techniques and Coding Standards for J2EE Projects

November 7, 2007

On www.theserverside.com you can find the chapter 4 free for download from the book Expert One on One J2EE Design and Development.
Although the book isn’t the newest ones, the free chapter includes valuable lessons about design pattern, favoring object composition over class inheritance and so forth.
Topics which I consider as a MUST for professional (java) developers.